Posted in This Is Real Life

My Reading at the 45th Annual UND Writers Conference


So yesterday (04/04/2014) concluded the 45th Annual UND Writers Conference, featuring authors/poets Geoff Dyer, Brian Maxwell, Sarah Leavitt, Jessica Lott, Robert Pinsky, and Colson Whitehead. It’s really an awesome event, and I hope that it carries on for at least another 45.

Each morning of the conference, there’s approximately an hour allotted to community members who wish to read their own material, and this year, I took a leap and did it.

The piece that I’m reading is a short story entitled “Break Through”. This isn’t the best recording in the world because it was done on my phone, as I haven’t a video camera, and it has this thing where it randomly decides to refocus and stuff. Also, my boyfriend was recording, so it’s a little shaky and he coughs at one point. Sorry about that. But I watched it last night and I’m pretty sure the sound is decent enough that it’s understandable.

I guess, truth be told, I’m not ENTIRELY certain how I feel/felt about this, but at least people laughed in the appropriate places. What was also interesting to me was that the people who seemed to be vaguely uncomfortable were not the adults or the older people, but in fact my peers. And that rings oddly to me.

Also: I know that people are going to want to tell me that they think, considering the material, that I mean “Breakthrough”, but I don’t, and I want you to think about what that means. I don’t want to explain it to you because I want you to try to work through it on your own. If I’d meant Breakthrough, I’d have titled it thus.

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Author:

I am a Writing and Publishing graduate student at Emerson College. I studied English and Linguistics in my undergraduate career, as well as a little bit of philosophy and four other languages (somewhat superficially). I am interested in language and how we use it culturally, as well as a vast collection of current sociopolitical issues, including race, sex, and gender, and the ways that those issues intersect each other.

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